Camera Shootouts

Xiaomi 11T Pro vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout

Camera duel between two “Pro” smartphones from the same Chinese company

Published

on

Xiaomi was the first to launch a 108MP-touting smartphone — the Mi Note 10 to be exact. Several years later, having a 108MP camera sensor in Android smartphones isn’t much of a big deal anymore. The Xiaomi 11T Pro and Mi 10T Pro are two of the smartphones in that list.

Xiaomi 11T Pro’s 108MP camera

For tech nerds out there, the Mi 10T Pro packs an older Samsung ISOCELL HMX sensor just like the Mi 11 and Mi Note 10. Meanwhile, Samsung’s ISOCELL HM2 sensor is found on the newer 11T Pro and the 11T as well. For a better distinction, the Galaxy S21 Ultra is equipped with the higher-end HM3 sensor.

But does that guarantee the best in class photography experience on a “Pro” Xiaomi device? Let’s find out in the samples below.

Disclaimer: Just like our other camera shootouts, photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Ultra-Wide

On paper, they both have different ultra-wide cameras: 13MP f/2.4 with 123-degree FoV on the Mi 10T Pro vs an 8MP f/2.2 120-degree UWA camera on the 11T Pro. But does the newer model perform better in this category?

#1

#2

#3

High Dynamic Range (HDR)

This is the ability of the smartphone camera to process a situation and be able to give commendable image output displaying the right amount of highlights, shadows, and contrast overall.

#4

#5

#6

#7

Saturation

Just a friendly reminder: Not all saturated photos are the accurate ones you see in real life.

#8

#9

#10

#11

Food

People love taking food photos with their smartphones — but which one looks more true-to-life?

#12

#13

#14

#15

Portrait

With a dedicated 5MP f/2.4 macro camera, portrait shots with better Depth of Field (or the ability to give creamier bokeh in layman’s term) should look better for the most part, but you be the judge.

#16

#17

#18

Selfies

Not the biggest selfie master but you can see the huge difference. You just have to pick which is which.

#19

#20

2x Telephoto

Both phones lack a dedicated telephoto zoom lens and heavily rely on digital cropping via its main lens — but the 11T Pro’s lack of OIS (which the Mi 10T Pro has) might be the biggest dealbreaker in this camera shootout segment.

#21

#22

#23

#24

#25

#26 (Night 2x zoom)

Night Mode

Now that a night shot was introduced in the previous segment, it’s time for some thorough night shot comparison.

#27

#28

#29

#30

BONUS

B1

B2

B3

Results

Xiaomi 11T Pro: Photo A

Xiaomi 10T Pro: Photo B

Google Pixel 2 XL: Photo C (Bonus part only)

Conclusion

Just like what I said in my Mi 11 vs Mi 10T Pro camera shootout, results vary (especially in saturation, AWB, HDR, and contrast) due to difference in software camera processing techniques and AI algorithms even if both are equipped with a large 108-megapixel camera sensor delivered varying image results. My Xiaomi 11T Pro review article also shared glimpses of how its cameras performed in day-to-day scenarios.

Moreover, the 2x telephoto zoom lens on the Xiaomi 11T Pro is mostly a miss. Not only did the lack of OIS degraded and made the image output a lot blurrier in comparison to the Mi 10T Pro, but it’s also a testament that not all newer phones are better — at least in the camera department. The 2017 flagship Google Pixel 2 XL can still keep up with the Night Mode competition despite having a Sony IMX362 sensor from 2016.

That being said, the Xiaomi 11T Pro and Mi 10T Pro are both capable smartphones. But if cameras are your main point of buying a new smartphone, you should really look elsewhere. The results are there, you just have to pick which is your best bet.

SEE ALSO:

Xiaomi 11T Pro vs Mi 10T Pro: 11 changes in 1 year

Xiaomi Mi 11 vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout

Camera Shootouts

iPhone 14 Pro Max vs 13 Pro Max vs S22 Ultra: Camera Shootout

A Very Different Camera Test

Published

on

The iPhone 14 Pro Max finally has an upgraded camera system — highlighted by its 48MP main camera sensor.

But does it really take better photos vs the iPhone 13 Pro Max and Samsung’s Galaxy S22 Ultra?

Find out in our photo-walk style camera shootout with the pro-photographer and Apple’s #ShotoniPhone Macro Challenge Global Winner Tom Reeves.

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

iQOO 9T vs vivo X80 Pro: Camera Shootout

Smartphone camera clash between the parent company and its sub-brand

Published

on

By

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

The vivo X80 Pro continues to be the company’s champ especially in the camera department. Paired with a very capable four-camera setup, it’s a smartphone you’ll want to take with you if you’re into serious mobile photography.

On the other hand, the iQOO 9T is also a flagship phone you might not have heard ever. It has a better chipset, faster wired charging support, and a flat display over its vivo counterpart. Albeit, the camera performance is what intrigued me — especially since the camera layout is very similar to each another (they also have the same vivo V1+ dedicated imaging chip).

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

BTW to those unaware, iQOO is vivo’s sub-brand. But even if both of these phones came from the same parent company, we still wanted to do a two-way camera battle. This is also for you to know if the cameras perform differently — and if the ZEISS partnership has any significance over iQOO’s regular lens coating and processing.

Disclaimer: All samples were taken in Auto Mode (except for Night and Portrait Mode). Photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Ultra-wide

These phones have similar yet different ultra-wide cameras. While both lenses have an aperture of f/2.2, there’s actually a big gap between the megapixel count — vivo’s X80 Pro features a 48MP shooter with a 114º Field of View (FoV). On the contrary, the iQOO 9T only has 120º 13MP super wide-angle camera. Is there any breakthrough in output though?

#1

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#2

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#3

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#4

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#5

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#6

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

Wide

Unlike the ultra-wide cameras, both the vivo X80 Pro and iQOO 9T are equipped with 50MP shooters. But there’s a catch: The iQOO 9T uses a Samsung GN5 sensor similar to that of the Galaxy S22 and S22+ series. Meanwhile, the X80 Pro has a custom-made Samsung GNV sensor exclusive to vivo’s X80 line. Lens diaphragms are also far alike: f/1.88 vs f/1.57 respectively — but you’ll still be the judge.

#7

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#8

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#9

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#10

#11

#12

#13

Telephoto Zoom

The vivo X80 Pro and iQOO 9T may have a similar 12MP telephoto camera with 2x optical zoom (f/1.85 and f/1.98 lens opening respectively), but the X80 Pro still has the clear advantage of having Gimbal OIS (Optical Image Stabilization). It also has an extra 8MP periscope telephoto lens for 5x optical zoom (and farther 60x digital zoom over 9T’s 30x). However, can you tell which phone is which in the samples below?

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

Night Mode

Daytime shots are one thing. But it’s also crucial to know if these phones can capture a subject or scenery well even when there’s hardly any natural light available.

#19 (Ultra-wide)

#20 (Ultra-wide)

#21 (Ultra-wide)

#22 (Ultra-wide)

#23

#24

#25

#26

#27

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#28 (2x zoom)

#29 (5x zoom)

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

#30 (2x zoom)

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

BONUS

Portrait Mode

Unlike the iQOO 9T, vivo’s X80 Pro has the ZEISS perks. That includes the ability to shoot like you are using ZEISS’ classic lenses (such as Biotar, Distagon, Planar, and Sonnar) in Portrait Mode.

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

Selfie

The iQOO 9T has a 16MP front camera while the vivo X80 Pro has a bigger 32MP selfie shooter. Similar enough, both phones have an f/2.45 lens opening.

Results

Some of you may have noticed but the results are consistent across the board:

Photo A – vivo X80 Pro

Photo B – iQOO 9T

Conclusion

If you have read our previous camera shootouts featuring the vivo X80 Pro, you might have already observed the nitty-gritty of the images above. The X80 Pro produced images that are overall cooler and less vibrant. That’s of course, over a course of software updates that vivo gave the X80 Pro over time.

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

Although admittedly some samples looked similar (that you can barely tell which phone is which), the iQOO 9T still has an overall warmer and more saturated output than the vivo X80 Pro.

iQOO 9T vivo X80 Pro

When it comes to zoomed shots, the vivo X80 Pro had an obvious advantage (especially in low-light scenarios) with its gimbal OIS support in the 2x zoom lens (less shaky images) and an extra 8MP periscope telephoto lens (clearer at 5x zoom). Still, the post-processing and AI algorithm of both phones are consistent all throughout with the iQOO 9T standing out more — warm and vibrant — which might have enticed more readers.

Shockingly, the X80 Pro displayed different results when photos are taken in night mode. If we’ll count, 10 out of 12 samples taken with the vivo were far warmer compared to the iQOO. While it comes to personal preferences (where I like warmer shots more), some of the images taken with the 9T are more color-accurate.

Generally speaking, you can’t go wrong any of these flagship smartphones. The biggest dealbreaker has got to be the amount you’re willing to spend for a flagship-grade smartphone camera.

With a difference of INR 30,000 (roughly US$ 375 / S$ 522 / ₱21,066) — the vivo X80 Pro having a discounted Indian SRP of INR 79,999 while the iQOO 9T now being sold at INR 49,999 — you can choose the latter minus all the bells and whistles of the X80 Pro.

Now if you’ll ask my personal take, I would still choose the X80 Pro because of these factors: wider FoV, an extra periscope telephoto lens, gimbal OIS, and the ever-fancy ZEISS partnership extras including the T* lens coating, Natural Color processing, Cinematic Mode when shooting videos, and the mimic of its lenses through Portrait Mode.

SEE ALSO:

vivo X80 Pro vs iPhone 13 Pro Max: Camera Shootout

vivo X80 Pro vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

Samsung Galaxy A73 5G vs vivo V23 5G: Camera Shootout

Which of these two East Asian 5G midrangers has the better cameras?

Published

on

By

What if you want a good set of cameras in a smartphone but you only have a budget below PhP 30,000/SG$ 700/INR 42,000 in your pocket?

GadgetMatch’s Camera Shootout segment isn’t particularly limited to high-end flagship smartphones with the best-in-class cameras. To prove that, I have tested two midrange phones by two different brands from two different East Asian countries.

Samsung, being a Korean giant, offers their top-notch midranger Galaxy A73 5G with a starting price of PhP 26,990/SG$ 698/INR 41,999. On the other hand, the Chinese phonemaker vivo has the V23 5G — directly competing at PhP 27,999/SG$ 699/INR 37,990.

The price gap isn’t that big to be a dealbreaker. But how about its camera quality? Let’s find out!

Disclaimer: Photo samples were taken in Auto, Portrait, and Night Mode. Photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Ultra-Wide

The Galaxy A73 5G and vivo V23 5G both have a decent set of ultra-wide cameras: 12MP vs 8MP respectively — both with an f/2.2 aperture. But which one is wider and better?

#1

#2

#3

#4

Wide

This is where things get a huge gap. The Samsung Galaxy A73 5G rocks a 108MP f/1.8 wide camera with PDAF and OIS. On the other hand, V23 5G’s megapixel count is half the size at 64MP with PDAF without OIS and an aperture of f/1.9 — but you’ll be the judge.

 #5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10 (Portrait)

#11 (Portrait)

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

Zoom

Both phones don’t feature telephoto lenses. Instead, there are just the 5MP f/2.4 macro and depth sensors on the A73 5G and a 2MP f/2.4 macro sensor for the V23 5G.

To test both phones’ limits, here are some 2x shots that relied on digital zoom via its main sensor.

#17

#18

Low-Light Mode

I used the default Auto Mode in photos where I think the lengthy Night Mode is unnecessary.

#19 (Ultra-Wide)

#20

#21

Night Mode

For better low-light photo results, I opted to use Night Mode among those scenarios where there’s barely a major source of light.

#22 (Ultra-Wide)

#23

#24

#25A (1x)

#25B (2x zoom)

BONUS: Selfies

Sorry for ruining the great set of photos above but if you value front cameras more than the rear cameras, this is an extra segment for you to see which one is a better selfie shooter — both day and night.

The only clear difference is that the V23 5G has a set of front-facing LED flash versus A73 5G’s fill light through its bright Super AMOLED+ display.

1A: Daytime (1x)

1B: Daytime (Ultra-Wide)

2A: Low-light without flash/fill light (1x)

2B: Low-light without flash/fill light (Ultra-Wide)

3A: Low-light with flash/fill light (1x)

3B: Low-light with flash/fill light (Ultra-Wide)

Results

The camera duel between these two midrange smartphones ends here. To make it easier for you, results are consistent from the beginning ’til the bonus part:

Photo A — vivo V23 5G

Photo B — Samsung Galaxy A73 5G

Conclusion

As evident in the photo samples, the vivo V23 5G produces warmer photos. Meanwhile, the Galaxy A73 5G leans more towards the cooler side.

Although the White Balance (WB) accuracy depends on the photo-taker’s real-life witnessing, the V23 5G produced most of the color-accurate shots in this set — from food, greeneries, skies, inanimate objects, and even portraits.

The samples taken from the V23 5G also look more pleasing with better balance in High Dynamic Ranger (HDR) as well as the right amount of highlights, shadows, and saturation throughout the set.

While the ever-consistent cooler WB of the A73 5G can instantly be fixed by adjusting temperature levels, over-sharpened photos cannot be corrected via post. Although it helps emphasize photo details more, most of the time, it just destroys the image.

The issues are more evident when shooting Night Mode samples. Not because it produced brighter and sharper shots, it doesn’t mean it’s the photo that’s closer to reality. Albeit, Samsung’s software processing technique helped in one instance when I shot a low-light ultra-wide sample with Night Mode turned on and the V23 5G’s version looked badly smudged.

Lastly, the selfies are just a whole lot better in the Chinese midranger thanks to the inclusion of dual front-facing cameras with dual LED flash that its Korean counterpart failed to deliver.

Generally speaking, you won’t get regret getting either of these phones since, in other areas, they are pretty close in performance.

If having a bigger main sensor and an even wider ultra-wide sensor are big factors in choosing your next smartphone, get the Galaxy A73 5G. But if you want to shoot shots that are closer to the naked eye plus selfies that make you look and feel good, the vivo V23 5G delivered better.

Now, I regret saying my hot take before that the vivo V23 5G “doesn’t have the best cameras in any midranger right now” — when it delivered the better photo-centric outturn in this camera shootout.

SEE ALSO:

Taking photos to the next level with the vivo V23 5G

Continue Reading

Trending